Targeting IoT

Dwaiter Weekly

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January 12, 2022

1_TOP NEWS

The Next Big Hacking Prize


There are now an estimated 17 billion Internet of Things devices worldwide, from printers to garage door openers, each one packed with software that can be easily hacked, CNBC reports. Security experts say IoT devices can be the entry points for attacks on critical infrastructure, like electrical grids or pipelines, or they can be the specific targets of criminals, as in the case of cars or medical devices that contain software.

2_BUSINESS

Microsoft Eyes $10 Billion ChatGPT Investment

Microsoft has been in talks to invest $10 billion in the owner of ChatGPT, the wildly popular app that was released last month, people familiar with the matter tell Semafor. The funding, which would also include other venture firms, would value OpenAI—the firm behind ChatGPT—at $29 billion.

3_INNOVATION

Ten Eye-Catching CES 2023 Innovations


A wide range of innovative products were on display at the CES tech show in Las Vegas last week. Among the fresh tech that caught the eye of Associated Press journalists covering the show: remote-controlled, electric inline skates from French startup AtmosGear; a handheld device from South Korean company Prinker that allows you to apply temporary tattoos; and the GE Profile smart mixer, which lets you weigh your ingredients in the bowl while you’re working.

4_MARKETING

Apple to Allow Customized Maps Info Card 

Apple is unveiling a free online tool that allows businesses to customize the information card shown by Apple Maps and other services with photos, details and even limited-time offers, Axios reports. Allowing businesses to better explain their services could help score some points with merchants and consumers and give Apple useful local info to power future services.

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5_DATA

NFL NextGen Stats Turns Focus to Kick Returns 


Returning a kick or punt for a touchdown has never been rarer in the NFL, but Nyheim Hines electrified Buffalo Bills fans with not one but two kickoff return scores last Sunday. In response, AP reports, the NFL NextGen Stats group has teamed up with machine learning engineers from Amazon Web Services to develop the first advanced stats model focused on kick and punt returns to quantify it in a new statistic set to be officially released to the public today.

6_CONTENT

Creator Economy Hype vs. Reality


After years of hype, the Creator Economy is slamming into reality, Alex Kantrowitz writes on his Big Technology blog. “Influencer programs are shuttering. Investment is drying up. And worsening economic conditions are threatening to crush creators and the tech infrastructure behind them.” He says industry predictions put the total value of the Creator Economy at $104.2 billion—a number that “now seems fanciful, especially since it includes money invested in startups that may never return their investments.” 

7_ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Regulating AI: A Robot's View

Artificial intelligence's potential in the public sector has grown exponentially, as have questions around appropriate guardrails. Government Technology interviewed the ChatGPT chatbot from OpenAI to see what it had to say. Quite a bit, it turns out.

8_MOBILE

Satellite Connectivity Coming to Android Phones


A new partnership between the satellite phone firm Iridium and chip giant Qualcomm will bring satellite connectivity to premium Android smartphones later in the year, the BBC reports. Qualcomm's chips are found in many Android-powered smartphones. Apple announced a satellite feature for the iPhone 14 in September.

9_SOFTWARE

Go RAW for Better Smartphone Photos


Professional photographers have long used the RAW format and editing software to turn image files into gorgeous pictures, the New York Times says. Editing a RAW file is more work, but it allows the photographer to have more control of the light and color in the image after it’s been captured.

10_SAY WHAT?

Unplug or Else 


Mumbai-based tech startup Dream Sports requires its employees to take a week off and "unplug" every year. And it means business: The firm imposes a fine of $1,200 on staff who contact vacationing colleagues, Business Insider reports.

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