Closed Culture

Dwaiter Weekly

/

July 28, 2022

1_TOP NEWS

Why Men Dominate Computer Science


Only 20 percent of computer science and 22 percent of engineering undergraduate degrees in the U.S. are awarded to women, causing them to miss out on flexible, lucrative and high-status careers. It’s not that they aren’t interested; it’s the culture of these fields and how they exclude women and girls, according to three academic researchers writing in Scientific American.

2_BUSINESS

Facebook’s Parent Posts First Revenue Drop

Facebook parent Meta Platforms on Wednesday posted its first ever quarterly decline in revenue, the Wall Street Journal reports. However, Meta’s daily active user base rose to 1.97 billion users, defying expectations of analysts who thought user numbers would fall.

3_SECURITY

N.Y. Moves to Defend Localities Against Cyber Attacks


Gov. Kathy Hochul has announced a new $30 million shared services program to provide county governments with tools to protect against cyber and ransomware attacks, Government Technology reports. The program would offer all 62 of New York’s counties and the cities of Rochester, Albany, Buffalo, Syracuse, and Yonkers with CrowdStrike endpoint detection and response services for free.

4_E-COMMERCE

The Rise of Micro-Subscriptions

Almost everything can now be bought under a monthly payment model, but for those who want to pay less, another option is emerging: consumption-based pricing. Smaller payments lower resistance to paying for a product or service and can also help alleviate some of the problems businesses face in managing subscription models, Protocol reports.

SPONSORED

5_TECHNOLOGY

Senate Passes Computer Chip Bill 


A bill designed to encourage more semiconductor companies to build chip plants in the United States passed the Senate on Wednesday, AP reports. The $280 billion measure includes federal grants and tax breaks for companies that construct their chip facilities in the U.S. A House vote is expected later this week.

6_WORK

How Experts See the Future of Remote Work


It's clear that remote work is not going away. But many unanswered questions about what happens next remain. To get a better idea of what could be coming, Recode asked a range of experts—people who study economics, human resources, and real estate—to make sense of what to expect in the future of remote work.  

7_SOCIAL MEDIA

Instagram Chief Responds to User Backlash

Instagram chief Adam Mosseri this week posted a reply to criticism of recent changes to the app, Social Media Today reports. He maintains that the loudest critics on Instagram are not reflective of broader community sentiment.

8_PRIVACY

LinkedIn Settings to Change Now


You might not think of LinkedIn as a privacy risk, but some of the app's default settings make you less anonymous than other social networks. LinkedIn has dozens of data, privacy and advertising settings you can control; the Washington Post offers a guide through the most important ones. 

9_DESIGN

The Value of a 'Soft Sprint'


Often, after a company releases a new product, it focuses on adding new features, not improving what’s already there. Small improvements will make a big difference in the user experience, however. That's why a 'soft sprint' can be so valuable, Edward Chechique writes on UX Planet. A soft sprint is a sprint focused solely on improving and fixing minor visual bugs; improving microcopy, and tuning some features.

10_SAY WHAT?

A Hot Idea 


Data centers are one of the backbones of the internet, but the huge amounts of heat generated by their servers is often wasted. The BBC reports that one facility in Denmark is putting that heat to good use: providing hot water and warmth to people’s homes.

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Looking for more?

Ready to discuss your project with us?